Why Every Author Needs Facebook Ads

In a recent guest post, Jon Drury gave us a primer on Facebook Ads and how he is using them to promote his book, Lord I Feel So Small. He is on to something big. Facebook Ads are powerful, but do you know why?

I’m a freelance writer but I hail from the world of corporate marketing. As a media buyer, I explored and purchased nearly every type of advertising. In my second life, I have supported my husband in his small businesses, making the most of every guerilla marketing (read: inexpensive) technique available. I have never been more excited than when I discovered the power in targeting and responsiveness Facebook Ads offer.
Targeting

Here is the beauty of this medium. Your potential readers have willingly supplied oodles of information about themselves. Those Profile Pages we all complete with our interests, favorite books, movies, music, religious preference, age, sex, region, etcetera?  Facebook Ads crawl this data and deliver your message to those who fit your criteria.

Suppose you liken your writing to that of Maeve Binchy. Under “Likes and Interests,” enter her name and click every applicable prompt. You may also want to enter Reading, Fiction, or Romance Books (or whatever is appropriate to your genre).

If you know your book will appeal to women aged 23-30, enter those under “Age and Sex.” You’ll notice the Estimated Reach number in the right hand column will decrease with each selection. That is a good thing. It means you are narrowing your field of ad recipients to only those who have expressed interest in what you are offering.

It’s vastly different than purchasing a newspaper ad or even a Web banner ad because you are driving the delivery van to your customer instead of hoping they cruise past your ad.

Responsiveness

Once you’ve submitted your Facebook Ad, you can track results almost immediately. You can look at today’s activity, yesterday’s, or last week’s. You can also see how many times your ad was delivered—shown on the right-hand column during a Facebook browsing session—and how many times users clicked on the ad.

If you don’t like what you see, simply revise your ad. It takes less than a day (usually) for the change to occur. That’s unheard of in traditional advertising.

A low delivery rate for your ad usually indicates you need to raise your bid, what you will pay for your ad. Facebook is interested in making money, too, so they will place higher paid ads ahead of yours.

I never bid top dollar but stay within the top quarter of the range suggested. You can also set a daily or monthly budget. Once it is reached, your ad will stop. No overspending. It’s beautiful. And you will be surprised how many impressions even $5 per day will get.
Per Click or Per Impression (CPC or CPM?)

This is a nuts and bolts question that can trip even the savvy marketer. You can experiment here but I recommend paying Per Impression for what we do as writers.

Your audience is a slow group. They need to see your name at least seven times before they realize you exist, probably another five or six before they wonder who you are, and more before they buy. Paying per impression gets your name out there.

Your Ad stats will tell you how many people clicked through your ad and your Facebook Fan Page stats (because you DO have a Fan Page, right?) will tell you how many of those clickers have turned into Fans. Your book sales will tell you if you have been effective at selling your product once your customer reaches you.

While Facebook Ads aren’t perfect, they have opened an avenue for inexpensive, targeted, and effective advertising where you retain full control.

Start small and experiment. Run two different ads and compare results. For very little investment, you can hone your message for maximum results.

Source: Blogging Bigstro
In a recent guest post, Jon Drury gave us a primer on Facebook Ads and how he is using them to promote his book, Lord I Feel So Small.

He is on to something big. Facebook Ads are powerful, but do you know why?

I’m a freelance writer but I hail from the world of corporate marketing. As a media buyer, I explored and purchased nearly every type of advertising. In my second life, I have supported my husband in his small businesses, making the most of every guerilla marketing (read: inexpensive) technique available. I have never been more excited than when I discovered the power in targeting and responsiveness Facebook Ads offer.
Targeting

Here is the beauty of this medium. Your potential readers have willingly supplied oodles of information about themselves. Those Profile Pages we all complete with our interests, favorite books, movies, music, religious preference, age, sex, region, etcetera?  Facebook Ads crawl this data and deliver your message to those who fit your criteria.

Suppose you liken your writing to that of Maeve Binchy. Under “Likes and Interests,” enter her name and click every applicable prompt. You may also want to enter Reading, Fiction, or Romance Books (or whatever is appropriate to your genre).

If you know your book will appeal to women aged 23-30, enter those under “Age and Sex.” You’ll notice the Estimated Reach number in the right hand column will decrease with each selection. That is a good thing. It means you are narrowing your field of ad recipients to only those who have expressed interest in what you are offering.

It’s vastly different than purchasing a newspaper ad or even a Web banner ad because you are driving the delivery van to your customer instead of hoping they cruise past your ad.

Responsiveness

Once you’ve submitted your Facebook Ad, you can track results almost immediately. You can look at today’s activity, yesterday’s, or last week’s. You can also see how many times your ad was delivered—shown on the right-hand column during a Facebook browsing session—and how many times users clicked on the ad.

If you don’t like what you see, simply revise your ad. It takes less than a day (usually) for the change to occur. That’s unheard of in traditional advertising.

A low delivery rate for your ad usually indicates you need to raise your bid, what you will pay for your ad. Facebook is interested in making money, too, so they will place higher paid ads ahead of yours.

I never bid top dollar but stay within the top quarter of the range suggested. You can also set a daily or monthly budget. Once it is reached, your ad will stop. No overspending. It’s beautiful. And you will be surprised how many impressions even $5 per day will get.
Per Click or Per Impression (CPC or CPM?)

This is a nuts and bolts question that can trip even the savvy marketer. You can experiment here but I recommend paying Per Impression for what we do as writers.

Your audience is a slow group. They need to see your name at least seven times before they realize you exist, probably another five or six before they wonder who you are, and more before they buy. Paying per impression gets your name out there.

Your Ad stats will tell you how many people clicked through your ad and your Facebook Fan Page stats (because you DO have a Fan Page, right?) will tell you how many of those clickers have turned into Fans. Your book sales will tell you if you have been effective at selling your product once your customer reaches you.

While Facebook Ads aren’t perfect, they have opened an avenue for inexpensive, targeted, and effective advertising where you retain full control.

Start small and experiment.

Run two different ads and compare results.

For very little investment, you can hone your message for maximum results.In a recent guest post, Jon Drury gave us a primer on Facebook Ads and how he is using them to promote his book, Lord I Feel So Small.

He is on to something big. Facebook Ads are powerful, but do you know why?

I’m a freelance writer but I hail from the world of corporate marketing. As a media buyer, I explored and purchased nearly every type of advertising. In my second life, I have supported my husband in his small businesses, making the most of every guerilla marketing (read: inexpensive) technique available. I have never been more excited than when I discovered the power in targeting and responsiveness Facebook Ads offer.
Targeting

Here is the beauty of this medium. Your potential readers have willingly supplied oodles of information about themselves. Those Profile Pages we all complete with our interests, favorite books, movies, music, religious preference, age, sex, region, etcetera?  Facebook Ads crawl this data and deliver your message to those who fit your criteria.

Suppose you liken your writing to that of Maeve Binchy. Under “Likes and Interests,” enter her name and click every applicable prompt. You may also want to enter Reading, Fiction, or Romance Books (or whatever is appropriate to your genre).

If you know your book will appeal to women aged 23-30, enter those under “Age and Sex.” You’ll notice the Estimated Reach number in the right hand column will decrease with each selection. That is a good thing. It means you are narrowing your field of ad recipients to only those who have expressed interest in what you are offering.

It’s vastly different than purchasing a newspaper ad or even a Web banner ad because you are driving the delivery van to your customer instead of hoping they cruise past your ad.

Responsiveness

Once you’ve submitted your Facebook Ad, you can track results almost immediately. You can look at today’s activity, yesterday’s, or last week’s. You can also see how many times your ad was delivered—shown on the right-hand column during a Facebook browsing session—and how many times users clicked on the ad.

If you don’t like what you see, simply revise your ad. It takes less than a day (usually) for the change to occur. That’s unheard of in traditional advertising.

A low delivery rate for your ad usually indicates you need to raise your bid, what you will pay for your ad. Facebook is interested in making money, too, so they will place higher paid ads ahead of yours.

I never bid top dollar but stay within the top quarter of the range suggested. You can also set a daily or monthly budget. Once it is reached, your ad will stop. No overspending. It’s beautiful. And you will be surprised how many impressions even $5 per day will get.
Per Click or Per Impression (CPC or CPM?)

This is a nuts and bolts question that can trip even the savvy marketer. You can experiment here but I recommend paying Per Impression for what we do as writers.

Your audience is a slow group. They need to see your name at least seven times before they realize you exist, probably another five or six before they wonder who you are, and more before they buy. Paying per impression gets your name out there.

Your Ad stats will tell you how many people clicked through your ad and your Facebook Fan Page stats (because you DO have a Fan Page, right?) will tell you how many of those clickers have turned into Fans. Your book sales will tell you if you have been effective at selling your product once your customer reaches you.

While Facebook Ads aren’t perfect, they have opened an avenue for inexpensive, targeted, and effective advertising where you retain full control.

Start small and experiment.

Run two different ads and compare results.

For very little investment, you can hone your message for maximum results.In a recent guest post, Jon Drury gave us a primer on Facebook Ads and how he is using them to promote his book, Lord I Feel So Small.
He is on to something big. Facebook Ads are powerful, but do you know why?
I’m a freelance writer but I hail from the world of corporate marketing. As a media buyer, I explored and purchased nearly every type of advertising. In my second life, I have supported my husband in his small businesses, making the most of every guerilla marketing (read: inexpensive) technique available. I have never been more excited than when I discovered the power in targeting and responsiveness Facebook Ads offer.

Targeting


Here is the beauty of this medium. Your potential readers have willingly supplied oodles of information about themselves. Those Profile Pages we all complete with our interests, favorite books, movies, music, religious preference, age, sex, region, etcetera?  Facebook Ads crawl this data and deliver your message to those who fit your criteria.
Suppose you liken your writing to that of Maeve Binchy. Under “Likes and Interests,” enter her name and click every applicable prompt. You may also want to enter Reading, Fiction, or Romance Books (or whatever is appropriate to your genre).
If you know your book will appeal to women aged 23-30, enter those under “Age and Sex.” You’ll notice the Estimated Reach number in the right hand column will decrease with each selection. That is a good thing. It means you are narrowing your field of ad recipients to only those who have expressed interest in what you are offering.
It’s vastly different than purchasing a newspaper ad or even a Web banner ad because you are driving the delivery van to your customer instead of hoping they cruise past your ad.

Responsiveness

Once you’ve submitted your Facebook Ad, you can track results almost immediately. You can look at today’s activity, yesterday’s, or last week’s. You can also see how many times your ad was delivered—shown on the right-hand column during a Facebook browsing session—and how many times users clicked on the ad.
If you don’t like what you see, simply revise your ad. It takes less than a day (usually) for the change to occur. That’s unheard of in traditional advertising.
A low delivery rate for your ad usually indicates you need to raise your bid, what you will pay for your ad. Facebook is interested in making money, too, so they will place higher paid ads ahead of yours.
I never bid top dollar but stay within the top quarter of the range suggested. You can also set a daily or monthly budget. Once it is reached, your ad will stop. No overspending. It’s beautiful. And you will be surprised how many impressions even $5 per day will get.

Per Click or Per Impression (CPC or CPM?)

This is a nuts and bolts question that can trip even the savvy marketer. You can experiment here but I recommend paying Per Impression for what we do as writers.
Your audience is a slow group. They need to see your name at least seven times before they realize you exist, probably another five or six before they wonder who you are, and more before they buy. Paying per impression gets your name out there.
Your Ad stats will tell you how many people clicked through your ad and your Facebook Fan Page stats (because you DO have a Fan Page, right?) will tell you how many of those clickers have turned into Fans. Your book sales will tell you if you have been effective at selling your product once your customer reaches you.
While Facebook Ads aren’t perfect, they have opened an avenue for inexpensive, targeted, and effective advertising where you retain full control.
Start small and experiment.
Run two different ads and compare results.
For very little investment, you can hone your message for maximum results.
- See more at: http://www.bloggingbistro.com/why-every-author-needs-facebook-ads/#sthash.zhcuX6FI.dpuf
In a recent guest post, Jon Drury gave us a primer on Facebook Ads and how he is using them to promote his book, Lord I Feel So Small.
He is on to something big. Facebook Ads are powerful, but do you know why?
I’m a freelance writer but I hail from the world of corporate marketing. As a media buyer, I explored and purchased nearly every type of advertising. In my second life, I have supported my husband in his small businesses, making the most of every guerilla marketing (read: inexpensive) technique available. I have never been more excited than when I discovered the power in targeting and responsiveness Facebook Ads offer.

Targeting


Here is the beauty of this medium. Your potential readers have willingly supplied oodles of information about themselves. Those Profile Pages we all complete with our interests, favorite books, movies, music, religious preference, age, sex, region, etcetera?  Facebook Ads crawl this data and deliver your message to those who fit your criteria.
Suppose you liken your writing to that of Maeve Binchy. Under “Likes and Interests,” enter her name and click every applicable prompt. You may also want to enter Reading, Fiction, or Romance Books (or whatever is appropriate to your genre).
If you know your book will appeal to women aged 23-30, enter those under “Age and Sex.” You’ll notice the Estimated Reach number in the right hand column will decrease with each selection. That is a good thing. It means you are narrowing your field of ad recipients to only those who have expressed interest in what you are offering.
It’s vastly different than purchasing a newspaper ad or even a Web banner ad because you are driving the delivery van to your customer instead of hoping they cruise past your ad.

Responsiveness

Once you’ve submitted your Facebook Ad, you can track results almost immediately. You can look at today’s activity, yesterday’s, or last week’s. You can also see how many times your ad was delivered—shown on the right-hand column during a Facebook browsing session—and how many times users clicked on the ad.
If you don’t like what you see, simply revise your ad. It takes less than a day (usually) for the change to occur. That’s unheard of in traditional advertising.
A low delivery rate for your ad usually indicates you need to raise your bid, what you will pay for your ad. Facebook is interested in making money, too, so they will place higher paid ads ahead of yours.
I never bid top dollar but stay within the top quarter of the range suggested. You can also set a daily or monthly budget. Once it is reached, your ad will stop. No overspending. It’s beautiful. And you will be surprised how many impressions even $5 per day will get.

Per Click or Per Impression (CPC or CPM?)

This is a nuts and bolts question that can trip even the savvy marketer. You can experiment here but I recommend paying Per Impression for what we do as writers.
Your audience is a slow group. They need to see your name at least seven times before they realize you exist, probably another five or six before they wonder who you are, and more before they buy. Paying per impression gets your name out there.
Your Ad stats will tell you how many people clicked through your ad and your Facebook Fan Page stats (because you DO have a Fan Page, right?) will tell you how many of those clickers have turned into Fans. Your book sales will tell you if you have been effective at selling your product once your customer reaches you.
While Facebook Ads aren’t perfect, they have opened an avenue for inexpensive, targeted, and effective advertising where you retain full control.
Start small and experiment.
Run two different ads and compare results.
For very little investment, you can hone your message for maximum results.
- See more at: http://www.bloggingbistro.com/why-every-author-needs-facebook-ads/#sthash.zhcuX6FI.dpuf